Coercive Control

Sign a Petition Calling on the Minister of Justice to Take Action on Coercive Control

Alongside the devastating toll of the COVID-19 pandemic, a shadow pandemic is taking place in Canada, with rates of intimate partner violence rising by up to 30 percent.

This includes coercive control, a pattern of behaviour used to regulate and dominate another person’s daily life, stripping away their freedom and sense of self. These acts are dangerous, often leading to escalating violence – including lethal violence.

In a recent report, the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights recommended Canada criminalize coercive control, giving the police and justice system a powerful tool to intervene in domestic violence cases, and victims the opportunity to be heard and protected.

Now, Committee member and Member of Parliament Randall Garrison has sponsored a parliamentary e-petition calling on the Minister of Justice to implement the Committee’s recommendations.

If this petition receives at least 500 signatures By June 13, the Government will be required to table a response.

Please join us in preventing further violence: sign the petition today, and urge your friends, family, colleagues, and neighbours to sign.

Sign the Petition

 

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Another Step Closer to the Criminalization of Coercive Control

Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights Tables Recommendations

Canada is another step closer to criminalizing coercive control with the tabling of a unanimous report by the tabling of a unanimous report by the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. The Committee and experts agree that the criminalization of coercive control is a critical step to addressing domestic violence. We encourage the government to act on the report’s recommendations and use it as a roadmap for adding coercive control to the criminal code. The report makes five recommendations:

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Coercive Control: This Changes Everything

Coercive control is subtle but harmful

When is exerting control part of the give-and-take of a relationship, and when is it abuse? Is wanting your partner to let you know where they are at all times, or insisting on a strict budget, domestic violence?

If it is a pattern of behaviour used to regulate and dominate another person’s daily life, it may be. It’s called coercive control, and it is a common and harmful form of abuse.

“Coercive control seeks to strip away a person’s freedom and their sense of self,” says Andrea Silverstone, CEO, Sagesse Domestic Violence Prevention Society.

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